How To: Use a SQL Database to Store and Retrieve Metrics (Replacing Elasticsearch)

Sometimes you just don’t want to use Elasticsearch to store your metrics, even though it’s really good at it. We typically recommend that you stick with ES if possible, because it gives you the option of installing Kibana, opening up a whole new world of advanced analytics over the metric data. However, if all you want is the basic graphs/charts shown in the apiman UI, you can easily switch to storing metric data in a database.

High Level Overview

  1. Deploy an appropriate JDBC datasource

  2. Enable the API Gateway JDBC initializer

  3. Configure the API Gateway metrics provider to be JDBC

  4. Configure the API Manager metrics accessor to be JDBC

Deploy an appropriate JDBC datasource

The first thing to do is deploy a datasource into WildFly that will be used by the JDBC metrics implementations. There are a number of ways to do this, and documenting how to create a datasource in WildFly is outside the scope of this guide. However, an example -ds.xml descriptor file, specifically for this purpose, can be found here:

Make sure you take note of the datasource jndi-name - you will need it when configuring the metrics implementations in apiman.properties
Don’t forget to also deploy the appropriate JDBC driver JAR for your database.

Enable the API Gateway JDBC initializer

Of course, there is a database schema that must be installed in your database, which creates the tables and indexes needed. This schema can be automatically created by apiman the first time it is used. To enable this feature, you must configure the API Gateway JDBC initializer in the apiman.properties file, like so:

# Initializer for the Gateway JDBC
# ################################
apiman.jdbc.datasource.jndi-location=java:jboss/datasources/apiman-gateway
apiman-gateway.initializers=jdbc
apiman-gateway.initializers.jdbc=io.apiman.gateway.engine.jdbc.JdbcInitializer
apiman-gateway.initializers.jdbc.datasource.jndi-location=${apiman.jdbc.datasource.jndi-location}
apiman-gateway.initializers.jdbc.datasource.type=mysql5

This initializer will run whenever apiman starts up, and it will install the API Gateway schema/DDL into the configured database so that the metrics JDBC implementations can function properly.

Note that you will need to set the correct value of apiman-gateway.initializers.jdbc.datasource.type based on the specific database you will be using. Possible values for this property include:

  • h2

  • mysql5

  • postgresql9

  • mssql11

  • oracle12

Configure the API Gateway metrics provider to be JDBC

Next, you just need to tell apiman that you want to use JDBC instead of Elasticsearch for the storage of metrics data. This can be done again by setting a specific property in apiman.properties:

apiman-gateway.metrics=io.apiman.gateway.engine.jdbc.JdbcMetrics
apiman-gateway.metrics.datasource.jndi-location=${apiman.jdbc.datasource.jndi-location}

The metrics will be stored in JDBC (asynchronously) instead of Elasticsearch!

Configure the API Manager metrics accessor to be JDBC

It doesn’t help us to store the metrics data in SQL unless we also query the data when showing information in the UI. For this reason you will need to configure the API Manager to use JDBC to retrieve metric information instead of using Elasticsearch. Again, this is done by editing the apiman.properties file:

# API Manager metrics settings
# ############################
apiman-manager.metrics.type=io.apiman.manager.api.jdbc.JdbcMetricsAccessor
apiman-manager.metrics.datasource.jndi-location=${apiman.jdbc.datasource.jndi-location}
If you are deploying the API Manager and API Gateway separately (on different nodes), make sure you edit the correct apiman.properties files on the correct nodes. Feel free to make all of the above changes to all your nodes, since any properties in apiman.properties will be ignored on nodes where certain components are excluded.

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